Symbols of Newfoundland and Labrador

The Pitcher Plant (sarracenia purpurea Linnaeus): The Provincial Flower

Pitcher Plant

History and Authority

The Pitcher Plant is a carnivorous plant commonly found growing in bogs both in Labrador and on the island of Newfoundland.

It was designated at the provincial flower pursuant to RSNL 1990 Chapter F-20, the Floral Emblem Act.

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The Newfoundland and Labrador Wordmark

Wordmark

History and Authority

Wordmark of the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador, adopted 2006. The flowers are stylized pitcher plants.

Usage and Practical Application

Standards for use of the NL Wordmark are established in the Graphic Standards Manual.

For permission to use the wordmark, please contact the Communications Branch, Executive Council, Confederation Building, P.O. Box 8700, St. John's, NL A1B 4J6.

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Black Spruce (Picea Mariana): The Provincial Tree

Black Spruce

History and Authority

Also known as the bog spruce. Though dark bluish-green in colour, it is called the "black" spruce to distinguish it from other types of spruce trees. A coniferous evergreen, it tolerates nutrient-deficient soils, growing well in areas with poor drainage. It is the most abundant tree in Labrador and appears on the Labrador flag. In North America, it grows as far north as Alaska and as far south as Massachusetts.

Designated Provincial Tree in November 1993. The tree is most characteristic of the boreal forests of Newfoundland and Labrador.

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Atlantic Puffin (Fratercula Arctica): The Provincial Bird

Puffin

History and Authority

With a thick orange, yellow, and grey bill and stout body, the puffin is able to fly in the air as well as swim underwater, and its razor-sharp claws allow it to dig deep burrows into the rich soil of seabird islands. It lays a single egg at the bottom of this protective burrow. Both parents nurture until the chick is ready for life at sea in late August or early September. Ninety-five per cent of North America's Atlantic Puffins are found in this province.

Designated Provincial Bird in 1991.

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Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) and Rock Ptargmigan (Lagopus muta): Provincial Game Bird

Ptargmigan

History and Authority

Willow Ptarmigan (Lagopus lagopus) and Rock Ptargmigan (Lagopus muta) are found throughout the province. The Willow Ptarmigan is a more sedentary species; the Rock Ptarmigan adopts a seasonal camouflage. Found primarily in barrens and high country, the partridge epitomizes the open wilderness. It is an arctic bird; the Burin and Avalon peninsulas may be the most southern, naturally occurring extremity for the bird's range in North America.

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The Newfoundland Pony: Provincial Heritage Animal

Pony

History and Authority

Designated by Order of the Minister of Forests Resources and Agrifoods 12 September 1997 under authority granted by SNL 1996 Chapter H-2.1 the Heritage Animals Act. The ministerial order identified the Newfoundland Pony Society as the group responsible for the promotion of this animal.

On 24 June 2010 the Animal Health and Protection Act received Royal Assent; it will replace the Heritage Animals Act but makes no substantial change to powers under the act with respect to Heritage Animals. The Animal Health Act will also come into force once new regulations have been written pending consultation.

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The Woodland Caribou: Animal Mascot of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment

Caribou

History and Authority

The Woodland Caribou, found throughout Newfoundland and Labrador, was adopted by members of the Royal Newfoundland Regiment as their in 1914 at the outbreak of World War I.

Five life-size bronze caribou memorial statues were executed by sculptor Basil Gotto following World War I and installed at the following battlefields: Beaumont-Hamel; Masnieres, Monchy-le-Preux, and Gueudecourt in France, and Courtrai/Kortrijk in Belgium. A sixth caribou was installed at Bowring Park, St. John's, the gift of Maj. William Howe Green, architect of Cabot Tower.

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Labradorite: The Provincial Mineral

Labradorite

History and Authority

Declared Provincial Mineral in 1975.

A variant of feldspar, its principal base colour is blue with iridescent green gold, and brown.

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Newfoundland and Labrador Tartan: Provincial Tartan

Tartan

History and Authority

Officially registered in 1973 with the Court of Lord Lyon, King of Arms of Scotland. Its International Tartan Index Number is 1543.

Created in 1955 by St. John's Water Street shopkeeper Samuel Wilansky to recognize the colours implied by The Ode to Newfoundland. The green represents the "pine clad hills", the white represents snow, the brown represents iron, and the red represents the Royal Standard. It is commonly found in tourist souvenirs and in clothing products.

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